25 Natural Landmarks to Cross Off Your Bucket List This Fall

So-called ‘drip pricing’ can make it difficult to determine the total cost of airline tickets and vacation rentals.
Fair warning: Local wildlife can bring traffic to a standstill on Parks Highway 3 while you're driving through Denali National Park. Then again, that is part of this road's allure.
Slide 1 of 26: The U.S. is brimming with beautiful natural landmarks, many of which are at their best during the fall season, including these awesome natural wonders.
Slide 2 of 26: The Grand Canyon is on just about everyone's travel bucket list and the fall is a great time to visit as the crowds have dispersed and visitors are able to find better deals on nearby hotels.
Slide 3 of 26: Popular with rock climbers, Yosemite National Park's El Capitan rock formation spans nearly 3,000 feet from base to summit along its tallest face and is composed almost entirely of granite.
Slide 4 of 26: Colorado's Mesa Verde National Park preserves the archeological heritage of the Ancestral Pueblo people, including 600 cliff dwellings dating back between 600 to 1300 CE.
Slide 5 of 26: Sometimes referred to as the Silent City of Rocks, this national reserve in Idaho features some of the most eye-catching rock formations in the world and is a popular area for rock climbing.
Slide 6 of 26: Kansas' Monument Rocks were the first to be designated a National Natural Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The chalk formations, which formed millions of years ago, stretch up to 70 feet in height.
Slide 7 of 26: This National Historic Site in western Nebraska rises approximately 300 feet above the North Platte River Valley and was once an invaluable landmark for settlers traversing the Oregon Trail.
Slide 8 of 26: Mammoth Cave houses the world's longest known cave system, with more than 400 miles having been explored and more passageways still being discovered.
Slide 9 of 26: The highest natural point in Massachusetts peaks at just under 3,500 feet, allowing visitors to see as far as 90 miles away on a clear day.
Slide 10 of 26: Michigan's Tahquamenon Falls are gorgeous during the fall as they're surrounded by colorful foliage. The landmark features dozens of drops and drains an average of 7,000 gallons per second.
Slide 11 of 26: Pipestone National Monument preserves the sacred grounds where generations carved pipes from the earth with the belief that the pipe's smoke carried one's prayer to the Great Spirit.
Slide 12 of 26: This complex system of mineral formations in Missouri's Ozarks dates back hundreds of millions of years and is the result of the erosion of massive limestone deposits.
Slide 13 of 26: New Hampshire's Flume Gorge is one of New England's most scenic natural landmarks, extending 800 feet out from the base of Mount Liberty with granite walls rising as high as 90 feet in some places.
Slide 14 of 26: The Great Falls of the Passaic River served as the focal point for the country's first planned industrial city in the late 18th century and for obvious reason. At more than 75 feet, it's one of the largest waterfalls in the U.S.
Slide 15 of 26: Straddling the U.S.-Canada border, these three breathtaking waterfalls rival the Grand Canyon in terms of allure and sheer awe. Horseshoe Falls is the most powerful in North America based on flow rate.
Slide 16 of 26: Located in the Great Smoky Mountains along the North Carolina-Tennessee border, Clingmans Dome is the highest point along the Appalachian Trail at an elevation of over 6,600 feet.
Slide 17 of 26: Another can't-miss landmark in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Place of a Thousand Drips is a low-flow waterfall that travelers can experience without even leaving their vehicle. You'll find it along Roaring Fork Motor Trail.
Slide 18 of 26: Quechee Gorge is the deepest gorge in Vermont at 165 feet. The surrounding state park is beloved by tourists not only for the views but the camping and outdoor activities.
Slide 19 of 26: Located within Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rainforest is one of America's largest temperate rainforests and features a lush green canopy that has to be seen to be believed.
Slide 20 of 26: Native Americans actually witnessed the formation of Crater Lake thousands of years ago. The deepest lake in the U.S., it boasts a depth of nearly 2,000 feet.
Slide 21 of 26: If you're seeking impressive seaside views this fall, head to Newport, Rhode Island to walk more than three miles of scenic shoreline. In addition to rocks and sea, visitors will see incredible cliffside mansions along the way.
Slide 22 of 26: Yellowstone National Park is picturesque in the fall and Old Faithful is a centerpiece. The iconic cone geyser was the first in the park to receive a name and erupts every 45 minutes to two hours.
Slide 23 of 26: This spectacular sandstone arch can be found in Utah's Arches National Park and fall is one of the best seasons to see it as visitors will get relief from scorching temperatures and tourist crowds.
Slide 24 of 26: Visitors to Alaska will find the Mendenhall ice caves just miles from Juneau. The once-in-a-lifetime site spans multiple caves and caverns inside of a more than 13-mile-long mountain glacier.
Slide 25 of 26: Venture to Colorado's Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park to find the deepest section of this mind-blowing gorge. Some of the deepest parts receive a little more than 30 minutes of sunlight in a given day.
Slide 26 of 26: This small group of islands nearly 70 miles west of Key West is constantly changing as a result of hurricanes but derive its name from the lack of springs and presence of sea turtles when it was discovered more than five centuries ago.

America’s Natural Wonders

The U.S. is brimming with beautiful natural landmarks, many of which are at their best during the fall season, including these awesome natural wonders.

Grand Canyon, Arizona

The Grand Canyon is on just about everyone’s travel bucket list and the fall is a great time to visit as the crowds have dispersed and visitors are able to find better deals on nearby hotels.

El Capitan, California

Popular with rock climbers, Yosemite National Park’s El Capitan rock formation spans nearly 3,000 feet from base to summit along its tallest face and is composed almost entirely of granite.

Mesa Verde Cliff Dwellings, Colorado

Colorado’s Mesa Verde National Park preserves the archeological heritage of the Ancestral Pueblo people, including 600 cliff dwellings dating back between 600 to 1300 CE.

City of Rocks, Idaho

Sometimes referred to as the Silent City of Rocks, this national reserve in Idaho features some of the most eye-catching rock formations in the world and is a popular area for rock climbing.

Monument Rocks, Kansas

Kansas’ Monument Rocks were the first to be designated a National Natural Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The chalk formations, which formed millions of years ago, stretch up to 70 feet in height.

Chimney Rock, Nebraska

This National Historic Site in western Nebraska rises approximately 300 feet above the North Platte River Valley and was once an invaluable landmark for settlers traversing the Oregon Trail.

Mammoth Cave, Kentucky

Mammoth Cave houses the world’s longest known cave system, with more than 400 miles having been explored and more passageways still being discovered.

Mount Greylock, Massachusetts

The highest natural point in Massachusetts peaks at just under 3,500 feet, allowing visitors to see as far as 90 miles away on a clear day.

Tahquamenon Falls, Michigan

Michigan’s Tahquamenon Falls are gorgeous during the fall as they’re surrounded by colorful foliage. The landmark features dozens of drops and drains an average of 7,000 gallons per second.

Pipestone National Monument, Minnesota

Pipestone National Monument preserves the sacred grounds where generations carved pipes from the earth with the belief that the pipe’s smoke carried one’s prayer to the Great Spirit.

Meramec Caverns, Missouri

This complex system of mineral formations in Missouri’s Ozarks dates back hundreds of millions of years and is the result of the erosion of massive limestone deposits.

Flume Gorge, New Hampshire

New Hampshire’s Flume Gorge is one of New England’s most scenic natural landmarks, extending 800 feet out from the base of Mount Liberty with granite walls rising as high as 90 feet in some places.

Paterson Great Falls, New Jersey

The Great Falls of the Passaic River served as the focal point for the country’s first planned industrial city in the late 18th century and for obvious reason. At more than 75 feet, it’s one of the largest waterfalls in the U.S.

Niagara Falls, New York

Straddling the U.S.-Canada border, these three breathtaking waterfalls rival the Grand Canyon in terms of allure and sheer awe. Horseshoe Falls is the most powerful in North America based on flow rate.

Clingmans Dome, North Carolina and Tennessee

Located in the Great Smoky Mountains along the North Carolina-Tennessee border, Clingmans Dome is the highest point along the Appalachian Trail at an elevation of over 6,600 feet.

Place of a Thousand Drips, Tennessee

Another can’t-miss landmark in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Place of a Thousand Drips is a low-flow waterfall that travelers can experience without even leaving their vehicle. You’ll find it along Roaring Fork Motor Trail.

Quechee Gorge, Vermont

Quechee Gorge is the deepest gorge in Vermont at 165 feet. The surrounding state park is beloved by tourists not only for the views but the camping and outdoor activities.

Hoh Rainforest, Washington

Located within Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rainforest is one of America’s largest temperate rainforests and features a lush green canopy that has to be seen to be believed.

Crater Lake, Oregon

Native Americans actually witnessed the formation of Crater Lake thousands of years ago. The deepest lake in the U.S., it boasts a depth of nearly 2,000 feet.

Newport Cliff Walk, Rhode Island

If you’re seeking impressive seaside views this fall, head to Newport, Rhode Island to walk more than three miles of scenic shoreline. In addition to rocks and sea, visitors will see incredible cliffside mansions along the way.

Old Faithful, Wyoming

Yellowstone National Park is picturesque in the fall and Old Faithful is a centerpiece. The iconic cone geyser was the first in the park to receive a name and erupts every 45 minutes to two hours.

Partition Arch, Utah

This spectacular sandstone arch can be found in Utah’s Arches National Park and fall is one of the best seasons to see it as visitors will get relief from scorching temperatures and tourist crowds.

Mendenhall Ice Caves, Alaska

Visitors to Alaska will find the Mendenhall ice caves just miles from Juneau. The once-in-a-lifetime site spans multiple caves and caverns inside of a more than 13-mile-long mountain glacier.

Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Colorado

Venture to Colorado’s Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park to find the deepest section of this mind-blowing gorge. Some of the deepest parts receive a little more than 30 minutes of sunlight in a given day.

Dry Tortugas, Florida

This small group of islands nearly 70 miles west of Key West is constantly changing as a result of hurricanes but derive its name from the lack of springs and presence of sea turtles when it was discovered more than five centuries ago.

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