The best-kept secret tourist spot in every state



Slide 1 of 52: There are plenty of popular tourist destinations you can visit throughout the United States.Finding a hidden gem while traveling, however, can often be the highlight of a great trip.For example, you could take a deep dive into Jacob's Well, a more than 100-foot-deep spring near Austin, Texas.You can also explore roadside attractions like Dinosaur Land in Virginia.Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.There are plenty of popular tourist destinations you can visit in every single one of the United States, from skyscrapers in big cities to famous national monuments.But sometimes, visiting more under-the-radar sites can be the highlight of a great trip. From a toy rocking horse farm in Massachusetts to lesser-known nature parks, there are hidden gems all across the country for you to explore.Check out the best kept secret things to do in every US state below.Read the original article on Insider
Slide 2 of 52: The location is home to 125 miniature structures of religious buildings, which were constructed by a monk named Joseph Zoetl beginning in 1892.According to the location's website, Zoetl created the structures using everything from costume jewelry to seashells, and did so whenever he wasn't working at the monastery. The miniatures have been on display since 1934, with tickets currently priced between $5 and $8.
Slide 3 of 52: According to Atlas Obscura, the trees were flipped upside down in 1985 by a landscaper named Steve, who was heading up to the Mendenhall Glacier to fix a stream that was destroyed in a landslide. After he arrived, Steve reportedly damaged a piece of moving equipment.He then got angry, and is said to have used the machine to slam a tree upside-down into the mud, according to Atlas Obscura. He continued to do so with another 20 dead trees, and then planted 75 flowers in the roots of each one.Visitors can usually view the tress from May until September.
Slide 4 of 52: The roadside attraction was built in 1953 by Juan Delgadillo, who made the location stand out by cutting the top off his car and attaching a Christmas tree to it, according to Atlas Obscura.Today, travelers can stop by the restaurant for a meal, or just to view the unique decorations that fill the building.

Slide 5 of 52: According to Explore Harrison, visitors often spend between 30 minutes and one hour hiking to reach the waterfalls. The trek, however, is said to be easy.Once there, travelers can typically see two streams of water cascading down the rocks, or three streams during days of high water.
Slide 6 of 52: The site was constructed with hand tools in the early 1900s by a Sicilian immigrant named Baldassare Forestiere.His aim was to turn "useless farmland into a vast network of rooms, tunnels, and courtyards," which could eventually become a resort, according to the location's website.While his plans never came to fruition, visitors can still take tours of the tunnels, and view the underground grapevines and fruit trees that were planted by Forestiere himself.
Slide 7 of 52: The castle was constructed by Jim Bishop after he purchased two-and-a-half acres of land in 1959. The castle still stands today, and welcomes travelers to climb to the very top free of charge. There's even a steel, fire-breathing dragon onsite.
Slide 8 of 52: According to the state of Connecticut, a stage actor named William Gillette began building the structure in 1914. Gillette helped to develop everything from walking paths to 47 unique doors on the property.While there is a fee for touring the castle, you can also relax outside for free.
Slide 9 of 52: Don't expect to find your favorite chain at this outdoor mall. Instead, the shopping center is home to a variety of independent retailers that sell everything from art to sunglasses, according to the center's Facebook page.

Slide 10 of 52: For many travelers in Florida, visiting Disney World and Universal Orlando is a top priority. But for a more underrated option, try Weeki Wachee Springs.The state park is most widely known for its mermaid shows, in which women swim while wearing mystical tails, but you can also ride waterslides, kayak, and spot manatees in the wild.
Slide 11 of 52: The Georgia destination is comprised of 16 gardens, as well as an array of greenery, 24 ponds, 32 bridge crossings, and 19 waterfalls, according to the Gibbs Garden Website. There's also a Manor House onsite, where visitors can learn about architecture.
Slide 12 of 52: Cat lovers visiting Hawaii can make a stop at the Lanai Cat Sanctuary. According to the organization's website, the location is home to hundreds of felines up for adoption. There's also no fee to enter, though the sanctuary accepts donations.
Slide 13 of 52: In the city of Blackfoot, you can learn all about the history of potatoes and take photos in front of giant vegetables at the Idaho Potato Museum, according to its website.There's also a gift shop available to visitors.
Slide 14 of 52: Casey, Illinois, is widely known for having the world's largest chair — but it's also home to the world's largest mailbox.According to Guinness World Records, visitors to the roadside attraction often walk up into the mailbox to take a photo, and then mail a letter there.

Slide 15 of 52: From the building's exterior to the attractions inside, it always looks like Christmastime when visiting Santa's Candy Castle. The store has tons of candy available to purchase, and also offers holiday trinkets, like Christmas ornaments, according to its website.Fans of Christmas will also enjoy the fact that Santa's Candy Castle is located within a town called Santa Claus, Indiana.
Slide 16 of 52: In the middle of Dubuque, Iowa, is the world's "shortest, steepest, scenic railway," according to the Fenelon Place Elevator Company's website. It costs $3 round-trip to ride in a car, where you'll have views of the Mississippi River and Dubuque business district.
Slide 17 of 52: While in Wamego, Kansas, the Oz Museum is a fitting place to visit. Inside, you'll find everything fromvintage memorabilia to modern-day collectibles, all of which celebrate the magic of "The Wizard of Oz," according to its website.
Slide 18 of 52: The Ghost Ship was once an award-winning navy ship called USS Sachem that was used in both world wars, according to Atlas Obscura.The ship was also featured in the background of Madonna's "Papa Don't Preach" music video shortly before being abandoned by owner Robert Miller. Today, the ruins are said to be popular with kayakers and travelers, as Atlas Obscura points out.
Slide 19 of 52: The Carousel Bar is located within the Hotel Monteleone in New Orleans, Louisiana. It seats 25 people and slowly rotates while visitors sip cocktails, making it the only revolving bar in the city, according to the Carousel Bar's website.
Slide 20 of 52: Travelers can find the world's largest rotating globe in Yarmouth, Maine, according to Atlas Obscura. One inch of the globe represents 16 miles on Earth, and the sphere is tilted at 23.5 degrees to match that of the actual planet.Visitors can view Eartha while driving on Maine's Interstate 295, or by entering the three-story building it's stored inside.
Slide 21 of 52: From swimming to viewing wild horses, there's tons to do while visiting Assateague Island in Maryland. According to the location's website, travelers can also spot wildlife like red foxes, bottlenose dolphins, horseshoe crabs, and peregrine falcons while there.
Slide 22 of 52: In Lincoln, Massachusetts, there's no shortage of toy rocking horses. Instead, there's a field called Ponyhenge where travelers can find dozens of them.According to Atlas Obscura, locals aren't sure why abandoned rocking horses started appearing in the field around 2010. They also haven't figured out who is responsible for consistently rearranging them. Regardless, it's quite the sight for travelers to see.
Slide 23 of 52: Regardless of the time of year, Bronner's Christmas Wonderland is worth a visit. The shop is found in the small town of Frankenmuth, and is actually the largest Christmas store in the world. While there, visitors can purchase items like ornaments, Christmas trees, nativities, and even Santa suits. 
Slide 24 of 52: Spoonbridge and Cherry is a quirky touch to the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. It was installed by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen in 1988, and has remained a hidden gem of the state ever since.Visitors can enter the park for free, and view the sculpture among a variety of others, according to the park's website.
Slide 25 of 52: According to the National Park Service, the Windsor house was built between 1859 and 1861 as the largest antebellum home in the state. But during a party in 1890, a guest dropped a cigarette onto the floor, unintentionally starting a fire that burned nearly the entire structure.Today, 23 Corinthian columns still stand, which visitors can see for free.
Slide 26 of 52: Prarie fields are shrinking in Missouri. According to Missouri State Parks, less than one percent of the state's tallgrass prairies currently exist, despite once covering a third of Missouri.At Prairie State Park, however, you'll find flourising fields of tall grass, tons of wildflowers, and herds of bison.
Slide 27 of 52: Located in West Glacier, Montana, Iceberg Lake is a glassy, green pool that's often filled with floating ice chunks in the colder months. The giant, snow-capped cliffs surrounding the lake are equally stunning.
Slide 28 of 52: Located along the Platte River, the Crane Trust Nature & Visitor Center in Grand Island, Nebraska, is home to protected lands where droves of cranes roost during the great sandhill crane migration each spring.
Slide 29 of 52: Visiting a nature preserve doesn't top many people's list of things to do in Las Vegas, Nevada, but it's worth taking a trip off the strip to hike through the colorful rock formations of Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area.
Slide 30 of 52: Each fall, the trees surrounding Kancamagus Highway in northeastern New Hampshire burst with color, making the 34.5-mile stretch of road one of the most scenic drives in the country.
Slide 31 of 52: Not only does this Weehawken, New Jersey, park boast stunning views of the New York City skyline, but it also has historical significance. On July 11, 1804, Aaron Burr shot and killed Alexander Hamilton in the park, which has since been named for the latter statesman.
Slide 32 of 52: You don't have to travel all the way to Mexico to observe remains from the Aztec civilization, as it turns out. Aztec Ruins National Monument in Aztec, New Mexico, has stone structures that has survived for nearly a millennium.
Slide 33 of 52: Storm King Art Center is a museum with large sculptures scattered across its 500 acres. It's a great place to enjoy a picnic or take a walk during fair weather.
Slide 34 of 52: With nearly 10,000 acres of wilderness, hiking trails, and waterfalls, DuPont State Recreational Forest in Cedar Mountain, North Carolina, is a great place to enjoy favorable weather.
Slide 35 of 52: Former president Theodore Roosevelt visited this stretch of wilderness, which has since been named in his honor, back in 1883. Now, visitors to Theodore Roosevelt National Park can take in views of the Missouri River and tons of wildlife.
Slide 36 of 52: The American Sign Museum in Cincinnati, Ohio, preserves 100 years of signs across nearly 20,000 feet of space. The museum has vintage signs from McDonald's, Holiday Inn, Gulf, Shell, Chevrolet, and more.
Slide 37 of 52: The Endangered Ark Foundation in Hugo, Oklahoma, is a nonprofit that provides a space for retired circus elephants to live. The organization also works to help the endangered Asian Elephants thrive in North America while educating visitors about the animals.
Slide 38 of 52: Silver Falls State Park in Silverton, Oregon, boasts 10 picturesque waterfalls worth exploring. A loop to visit all 10 waterfalls is 6.9 miles long, per Oregon.com.
Slide 39 of 52: Nestled in the southwest corner of Pennsylvania, Fallingwater is an architectural masterpiece designed by famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright that seamlessly blends into the surrounding wilderness of Bear Run Nature Reserve.
Slide 40 of 52: Castle Hill Lighthouse in Newport, Rhode Island, is a 121-year-old granite lighthouse with stunning views of Newport Harbor, Pell Bridge, and summer sunsets. The structure sits near the grounds of Castle Hill Inn, which served as "Farhampton Inn" in the final season of "How I Met Your Mother."
Slide 41 of 52: This gorgeous, colossal Oak tree located just outside of Charleston, South Carolina, is estimated to be somewhere between 400 and 500 years old. Its trunk measures 28 feet around and it covers a more than 17,000-square-foot area in shade.
Slide 42 of 52: Mount Rushmore is far from an underrated tourist destination, but the winding, scenic road and narrow tunnels of nearby Iron Mountain Road certainly is. Take in stunning views of the famous monument while also exploring the beautiful topography of southwestern South Dakota.
Slide 43 of 52: You can get a glimpse of colorful sunsets, gorgeous scenery, and wild black bears at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Gatlinburg, Tennessee.
Slide 44 of 52: Jacob's Well is a more than 100-foot-deep spring near Austin, Texas. Swimmers and divers can explore the spring and the hidden underwater caves from May 1 to September 30 each year.
Slide 45 of 52: Millions of years ago, dinosaurs roamed the land where Jensen, Utah, now sits. Today, visitors of the Dinosaur National Monument can explore more than 1,500 dinosaur bones embedded into the red rocks of Quarry Exhibit Hall, according to the National Park Service.
Slide 46 of 52: According to Atlas Obscura, this Vermont location is "the world's largest deep-hole dimension granite quarry." Those who visit are taken by van to the top of the quarry, where they're then guided through a tour. Before leaving, visitors can actually take some small pieces of granite home with them.
Slide 47 of 52: In White Post, Virginia, travelers can learn about prehistoric creatures by walking through this roadside attraction that's filled with larger-than-life statues. There's also a gift shop where visitors can purchase dinosaur-themed souvenirs.
Slide 48 of 52: The most northwestern point of the contiguous United States, Cape Flattery provides a gorgeous view of the Pacific Ocean and the Washington coastline. If you're lucky, you may spot whales and otters in the water during your visit.
Slide 49 of 52: Although Washington National Cathedral is known for hosting the funerals of many late statesmen and presidents, it does not top many people's lists of places to visit while in the nation's capital. The cathedral, which is the sixth largest in the world, has stunning Gothic architecture, intricate stained glass windows, and there are beautiful gardens on the grounds.
Slide 50 of 52: According to NPR, West Virginia's Greenbrier Resort is home to an extensive underground bunker system designed to protect members of Congress in the event of a nuclear fallout during the Cold War. Now, visitors can take tours of the 112,544-square-foot bunker.
Slide 51 of 52: In the warmer months, visitors can kayak through the stunning natural cliff formations of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore Ice Caves. In the winter, brave souls can walk across a frozen Lake Superior to explore the icicles that often form in the caves.
Slide 52 of 52: Devils Tower National Monument is a stunning yet strange rock outcrop in the middle of a prairie in Wyoming. With vertical cracks running the entire 867 feet of the cliff, Devils Tower is a popular attraction among rock climbers.Read more:A stunning private island that comes with a 4-bedroom home is up for sale in Norway, and it's a hermit's dreamA wine company wants to pay you $10,000 to be its 'rosé influencer' and it comes with a trip to France16 places around the world that are being ruined by tourism12 stunning photos of places that naturally glow in the dark

The best-kept secret tourist spot in every state

There are plenty of popular tourist destinations you can visit in every single one of the United States, from skyscrapers in big cities to famous national monuments.

But sometimes, visiting more under-the-radar sites can be the highlight of a great trip. From a toy rocking horse farm in Massachusetts to lesser-known nature parks, there are hidden gems all across the country for you to explore.

Check out the best kept secret things to do in every US state below.

ALABAMA: Ave Maria Grotto

The location is home to 125 miniature structures of religious buildings, which were constructed by a monk named Joseph Zoetl beginning in 1892.

According to the location’s website, Zoetl created the structures using everything from costume jewelry to seashells, and did so whenever he wasn’t working at the monastery. The miniatures have been on display since 1934, with tickets currently priced between $5 and $8.

ALASKA: Mendenhall Glacier

According to Atlas Obscura, the trees were flipped upside down in 1985 by a landscaper named Steve, who was heading up to the Mendenhall Glacier to fix a stream that was destroyed in a landslide. After he arrived, Steve reportedly damaged a piece of moving equipment.

He then got angry, and is said to have used the machine to slam a tree upside-down into the mud, according to Atlas Obscura. He continued to do so with another 20 dead trees, and then planted 75 flowers in the roots of each one.

Visitors can usually view the tress from May until September.

ARIZONA: Delgadillo’s Snow Cap Drive-In

The roadside attraction was built in 1953 by Juan Delgadillo, who made the location stand out by cutting the top off his car and attaching a Christmas tree to it, according to Atlas Obscura.

Today, travelers can stop by the restaurant for a meal, or just to view the unique decorations that fill the building.

ARKANSAS: Triple Falls Trail

According to Explore Harrison, visitors often spend between 30 minutes and one hour hiking to reach the waterfalls. The trek, however, is said to be easy.

Once there, travelers can typically see two streams of water cascading down the rocks, or three streams during days of high water.

CALIFORNIA: Forestiere Underground Gardens

The site was constructed with hand tools in the early 1900s by a Sicilian immigrant named Baldassare Forestiere.

His aim was to turn “useless farmland into a vast network of rooms, tunnels, and courtyards,” which could eventually become a resort, according to the location’s website.

While his plans never came to fruition, visitors can still take tours of the tunnels, and view the underground grapevines and fruit trees that were planted by Forestiere himself.

COLORADO: Bishop’s Castle

The castle was constructed by Jim Bishop after he purchased two-and-a-half acres of land in 1959. The castle still stands today, and welcomes travelers to climb to the very top free of charge. There’s even a steel, fire-breathing dragon onsite.

CONNECTICUT: Gillette Castle State Park

According to the state of Connecticut, a stage actor named William Gillette began building the structure in 1914. Gillette helped to develop everything from walking paths to 47 unique doors on the property.

While there is a fee for touring the castle, you can also relax outside for free.

DELAWARE: Penny Lane Mall

Don’t expect to find your favorite chain at this outdoor mall. Instead, the shopping center is home to a variety of independent retailers that sell everything from art to sunglasses, according to the center’s Facebook page.

FLORIDA: Weeki Wachee Springs

For many travelers in Florida, visiting Disney World and Universal Orlando is a top priority. But for a more underrated option, try Weeki Wachee Springs.

The state park is most widely known for its mermaid shows, in which women swim while wearing mystical tails, but you can also ride waterslides, kayak, and spot manatees in the wild.

GEORGIA: Gibbs Garden

The Georgia destination is comprised of 16 gardens, as well as an array of greenery, 24 ponds, 32 bridge crossings, and 19 waterfalls, according to the Gibbs Garden Website. There’s also a Manor House onsite, where visitors can learn about architecture.

HAWAII: Lanai Cat Sanctuary

Cat lovers visiting Hawaii can make a stop at the Lanai Cat Sanctuary. According to the organization’s website, the location is home to hundreds of felines up for adoption. There’s also no fee to enter, though the sanctuary accepts donations.

IDAHO: Potato Museum

In the city of Blackfoot, you can learn all about the history of potatoes and take photos in front of giant vegetables at the Idaho Potato Museum, according to its website.

There’s also a gift shop available to visitors.

ILLINOIS: The World’s Largest Mailbox

Casey, Illinois, is widely known for having the world’s largest chair — but it’s also home to the world’s largest mailbox.

According to Guinness World Records, visitors to the roadside attraction often walk up into the mailbox to take a photo, and then mail a letter there.

INDIANA: Santa’s Candy Castle

From the building’s exterior to the attractions inside, it always looks like Christmastime when visiting Santa’s Candy Castle. The store has tons of candy available to purchase, and also offers holiday trinkets, like Christmas ornaments, according to its website.

Fans of Christmas will also enjoy the fact that Santa’s Candy Castle is located within a town called Santa Claus, Indiana.

IOWA: Fenelon Place Elevator Company

In the middle of Dubuque, Iowa, is the world’s “shortest, steepest, scenic railway,” according to the Fenelon Place Elevator Company’s website. It costs $3 round-trip to ride in a car, where you’ll have views of the Mississippi River and Dubuque business district.

KANSAS: Oz Museum

While in Wamego, Kansas, the Oz Museum is a fitting place to visit. Inside, you’ll find everything fromvintage memorabilia to modern-day collectibles, all of which celebrate the magic of “The Wizard of Oz,” according to its website.

KENTUCKY: The Ghost Ship

The Ghost Ship was once an award-winning navy ship called USS Sachem that was used in both world wars, according to Atlas Obscura.

The ship was also featured in the background of Madonna’s “Papa Don’t Preach” music video shortly before being abandoned by owner Robert Miller. Today, the ruins are said to be popular with kayakers and travelers, as Atlas Obscura points out.

LOUISIANA: Carousel Bar

The Carousel Bar is located within the Hotel Monteleone in New Orleans, Louisiana. It seats 25 people and slowly rotates while visitors sip cocktails, making it the only revolving bar in the city, according to the Carousel Bar’s website.

MAINE: Eartha

Travelers can find the world’s largest rotating globe in Yarmouth, Maine, according to Atlas Obscura. One inch of the globe represents 16 miles on Earth, and the sphere is tilted at 23.5 degrees to match that of the actual planet.

Visitors can view Eartha while driving on Maine’s Interstate 295, or by entering the three-story building it’s stored inside.

MARYLAND: Assateague Island

From swimming to viewing wild horses, there’s tons to do while visiting Assateague Island in Maryland. According to the location’s website, travelers can also spot wildlife like red foxes, bottlenose dolphins, horseshoe crabs, and peregrine falcons while there.

MASSACHUSETTS: Ponyhenge

In Lincoln, Massachusetts, there’s no shortage of toy rocking horses. Instead, there’s a field called Ponyhenge where travelers can find dozens of them.

According to Atlas Obscura, locals aren’t sure why abandoned rocking horses started appearing in the field around 2010. They also haven’t figured out who is responsible for consistently rearranging them. Regardless, it’s quite the sight for travelers to see.

MICHIGAN: Bronner’s Christmas Wonderland

Regardless of the time of year, Bronner’s Christmas Wonderland is worth a visit. The shop is found in the small town of Frankenmuth, and is actually the largest Christmas store in the world. 

While there, visitors can purchase items like ornaments, Christmas trees, nativities, and even Santa suits. 

MINNESOTA: Spoonbridge and Cherry

Spoonbridge and Cherry is a quirky touch to the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. It was installed by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen in 1988, and has remained a hidden gem of the state ever since.

Visitors can enter the park for free, and view the sculpture among a variety of others, according to the park’s website.

MISSISSIPPI: Windsor Ruins

According to the National Park Service, the Windsor house was built between 1859 and 1861 as the largest antebellum home in the state. But during a party in 1890, a guest dropped a cigarette onto the floor, unintentionally starting a fire that burned nearly the entire structure.

Today, 23 Corinthian columns still stand, which visitors can see for free.

MISSOURI: Prairie State Park

Prarie fields are shrinking in Missouri. According to Missouri State Parks, less than one percent of the state’s tallgrass prairies currently exist, despite once covering a third of Missouri.

At Prairie State Park, however, you’ll find flourising fields of tall grass, tons of wildflowers, and herds of bison.

MONTANA: Iceberg Lake Trail

Located in West Glacier, Montana, Iceberg Lake is a glassy, green pool that’s often filled with floating ice chunks in the colder months. The giant, snow-capped cliffs surrounding the lake are equally stunning.

NEBRASKA: Crane Trust Nature & Visitor Center

Located along the Platte River, the Crane Trust Nature & Visitor Center in Grand Island, Nebraska, is home to protected lands where droves of cranes roost during the great sandhill crane migration each spring.

NEVADA: Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

Visiting a nature preserve doesn’t top many people’s list of things to do in Las Vegas, Nevada, but it’s worth taking a trip off the strip to hike through the colorful rock formations of Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area.

NEW HAMPSHIRE: Kancamagus Highway

Each fall, the trees surrounding Kancamagus Highway in northeastern New Hampshire burst with color, making the 34.5-mile stretch of road one of the most scenic drives in the country.

NEW JERSEY: Hamilton Park

Not only does this Weehawken, New Jersey, park boast stunning views of the New York City skyline, but it also has historical significance. On July 11, 1804, Aaron Burr shot and killed Alexander Hamilton in the park, which has since been named for the latter statesman.

NEW MEXICO: Aztec Ruins National Monument

You don’t have to travel all the way to Mexico to observe remains from the Aztec civilization, as it turns out. Aztec Ruins National Monument in Aztec, New Mexico, has stone structures that has survived for nearly a millennium.

NEW YORK: Storm King Art Center

Storm King Art Center is a museum with large sculptures scattered across its 500 acres. It’s a great place to enjoy a picnic or take a walk during fair weather.

NORTH CAROLINA: DuPont State Recreational Forest

With nearly 10,000 acres of wilderness, hiking trails, and waterfalls, DuPont State Recreational Forest in Cedar Mountain, North Carolina, is a great place to enjoy favorable weather.

NORTH DAKOTA: Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Former president Theodore Roosevelt visited this stretch of wilderness, which has since been named in his honor, back in 1883. Now, visitors to Theodore Roosevelt National Park can take in views of the Missouri River and tons of wildlife.

OHIO: The American Sign Museum

The American Sign Museum in Cincinnati, Ohio, preserves 100 years of signs across nearly 20,000 feet of space. The museum has vintage signs from McDonald’s, Holiday Inn, Gulf, Shell, Chevrolet, and more.

OKLAHOMA: Endangered Ark Foundation

The Endangered Ark Foundation in Hugo, Oklahoma, is a nonprofit that provides a space for retired circus elephants to live. The organization also works to help the endangered Asian Elephants thrive in North America while educating visitors about the animals.

OREGON: Silver Falls State Park

Silver Falls State Park in Silverton, Oregon, boasts 10 picturesque waterfalls worth exploring. A loop to visit all 10 waterfalls is 6.9 miles long, per Oregon.com.

PENNSYLVANIA: Fallingwater

Nestled in the southwest corner of Pennsylvania, Fallingwater is an architectural masterpiece designed by famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright that seamlessly blends into the surrounding wilderness of Bear Run Nature Reserve.

RHODE ISLAND: Castle Hill Lighthouse

Castle Hill Lighthouse in Newport, Rhode Island, is a 121-year-old granite lighthouse with stunning views of Newport Harbor, Pell Bridge, and summer sunsets. The structure sits near the grounds of Castle Hill Inn, which served as “Farhampton Inn” in the final season of “How I Met Your Mother.”

SOUTH CAROLINA: Angel Oak Tree

This gorgeous, colossal Oak tree located just outside of Charleston, South Carolina, is estimated to be somewhere between 400 and 500 years old. Its trunk measures 28 feet around and it covers a more than 17,000-square-foot area in shade.

SOUTH DAKOTA: Iron Mountain Road

Mount Rushmore is far from an underrated tourist destination, but the winding, scenic road and narrow tunnels of nearby Iron Mountain Road certainly is. Take in stunning views of the famous monument while also exploring the beautiful topography of southwestern South Dakota.

TENNESSEE: Great Smoky Mountains National Park

You can get a glimpse of colorful sunsets, gorgeous scenery, and wild black bears at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Gatlinburg, Tennessee.

TEXAS: Jacob’s Well Natural Area-Hays County Parks

Jacob’s Well is a more than 100-foot-deep spring near Austin, Texas. Swimmers and divers can explore the spring and the hidden underwater caves from May 1 to September 30 each year.

UTAH: Dinosaur National Monument

Millions of years ago, dinosaurs roamed the land where Jensen, Utah, now sits. Today, visitors of the Dinosaur National Monument can explore more than 1,500 dinosaur bones embedded into the red rocks of Quarry Exhibit Hall, according to the National Park Service.

VERMONT: Rock of Ages Granite Quarry

According to Atlas Obscura, this Vermont location is “the world’s largest deep-hole dimension granite quarry.” Those who visit are taken by van to the top of the quarry, where they’re then guided through a tour. Before leaving, visitors can actually take some small pieces of granite home with them.

VIRGINIA: Dinosaur Land

In White Post, Virginia, travelers can learn about prehistoric creatures by walking through this roadside attraction that’s filled with larger-than-life statues. There’s also a gift shop where visitors can purchase dinosaur-themed souvenirs.

WASHINGTON: Cape Flattery

The most northwestern point of the contiguous United States, Cape Flattery provides a gorgeous view of the Pacific Ocean and the Washington coastline. If you’re lucky, you may spot whales and otters in the water during your visit.

WASHINGTON, DC: Washington National Cathedral

Although Washington National Cathedral is known for hosting the funerals of many late statesmen and presidents, it does not top many people’s lists of places to visit while in the nation’s capital. The cathedral, which is the sixth largest in the world, has stunning Gothic architecture, intricate stained glass windows, and there are beautiful gardens on the grounds.

WEST VIRGINIA: Greenbrier Government Relocation Facility

According to NPR, West Virginia’s Greenbrier Resort is home to an extensive underground bunker system designed to protect members of Congress in the event of a nuclear fallout during the Cold War. Now, visitors can take tours of the 112,544-square-foot bunker.

WISCONSIN: Apostle Islands National Lakeshore Ice Caves

In the warmer months, visitors can kayak through the stunning natural cliff formations of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore Ice Caves. In the winter, brave souls can walk across a frozen Lake Superior to explore the icicles that often form in the caves.

WYOMING: Devils Tower National Monument

Devils Tower National Monument is a stunning yet strange rock outcrop in the middle of a prairie in Wyoming. With vertical cracks running the entire 867 feet of the cliff, Devils Tower is a popular attraction among rock climbers.

Source: Read Full Article