The least populated places on Earth



Slide 1 of 21: The seven billion people who call Earth home are far from spread evenly around the globe. As reported in The Atlantic, half of the world’s population lives on one per cent of the Earth’s surface. It’s not surprising, then, that certain places are nearly deserted or unoccupied. If you’re the type of person who loves wide-open spaces or you just want to get away from your neighbours, here’s a roundup of the 20 least populated places on the planet.
Slide 2 of 21: With a demographic density of 3.5 people per square kilometre (nine people per square mile), French Guiana is France’s second-least populated territory. The land in this department is owned by France and is 90 per cent covered by the Guianan Moist Forests. Most of the population is concentrated on the coast of this South American territory. Thanks to its lush green resources, French Guiana enjoys exceptional biodiversity.
Slide 3 of 21: Stretching over nearly three million square kilometres (1.16 million square miles), the Sakha Republic is one of the least populated places in the world. Its density is barely 0.3 people per square kilometre (0.8 people per square mile). Its geographical size, along with its cold northern climate, limit urban development in this region of Russia. The coldest village on Earth, Oymyakon, is found in the Sakha Republic. The average temperature in January is -46 degrees Celsius (-51 degrees Fahrenheit).
Slide 4 of 21: Mauritania is one of the least populated countries in the world. Despite being about the size of Egypt, this African country has scarcely four people per square kilometre (10 people per square mile). Most of its territory is covered by the Sahara Desert. The desertification of its land is accentuated by its dry and extremely hot climate.

Slide 5 of 21: Mongolia wins the prize for being the least densely populated country in the world, with only 1.5 people per square kilometre (four people per square mile). Nearly 30 per cent of Mongols are either nomadic or semi-nomadic. This is partially explained by the traditional way of life that is based on shepherding large herds of animals. Mongolia also has a climate and soil that is very dry, two factors that are not conducive to urbanization.
Slide 6 of 21: Sterile and hostile, Antarctica is, without a doubt, the least populated place on Earth. There is no permanent population, although some 1,500 scientists reside there for fixed periods of time. However, nearly 80,000 tourists are expected to set foot on its glaciers in 2020.
Slide 7 of 21: The Australian Outback might draw a good number of tourists looking for an adventure, but it certainly doesn’t have a lot of permanent residents. With fewer than one million inhabitants, its area is equal to about two-thirds of Europe. The population density is barely 0.1 person per square kilometre (0.25 person per square mile) in this red desert. The temperature shifts are also drastic—at night the thermometer can reach almost freezing, then swing to above 40 C (104 F) during the day.
Slide 8 of 21: With a population density of less than one person per square kilometre (2.5 people per square mile), you could say that the Falkland Islands are essentially uninhabited. This overseas British territory is made up of two main islands, East and West Falkland, along with 700 smaller islands. Many tourists visit the islands to see the king penguins, a major attraction of this isolated destination.
Slide 9 of 21: Despite having a population of nearly 60,000, the population density of Greenland remains one of the lowest in the world—around 0.3 person per square kilometre (0.8 person per square mile)—due to the country’s enormous land mass of over two million square kilometres (775,000 square miles). Surprisingly, there are no roads that connect the different villages on what is essentially the largest island in the world. Tourists and residents must travel by boat, dogsled, helicopter, plane, or snowmobile.

Slide 10 of 21: Along with living in paradise, Pitcairn residents are unlikely to get in each other’s way. They number barely 50 on a land mass of 47 square kilometres (18 square miles). Pitcairn Island is the only inhabited island of the four that make up this unique British territory in the Pacific Ocean. Colonization of the island came about after a mutiny on the HMS Bounty at the end of the 1700s. For the mutineers, Pitcairn seemed like the perfect place to escape justice and live in peace.
Slide 11 of 21: Namibia is among the top three countries in the world with the lowest population density. With just 2.85 people per square kilometre (7.4 people per square mile), the 2.5 million inhabitants of this southern African country are divided into 11 ethnicities. Nearly half of the population consider themselves Ovambo.
Slide 12 of 21: The 19th-largest island in the world is home to about three people per square kilometre (eight people per square mile). Located in the North Atlantic Ocean, this isolated place is covered in volcanoes, fjords, and waterfalls. Nearly two-thirds of the population live in the country’s capital, Reykjavik.
Slide 13 of 21: Dispersed throughout the Indian Ocean, the sub-Antarctic district of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands is composed of four archipelagos: the Kerguelen Islands, the Crozet Islands, and the St. Paul and Amsterdam Islands. This French overseas territory is situated in a very inhospitable part of the world. The temperature rarely goes above freezing, and the winds can easily reach 250 km/h (155 mph)—making it impossible for a permanent population to reside there. Scientific bases hold between 40 and 100 researchers for a few months at a time. The largest island in the sub-Antarctic district is Kerguelen, which spans roughly 7,000 square kilometres (2,700 square miles).
Slide 14 of 21: This British overseas territory has a permanent population of between 200 and 1,400 inhabitants, depending on the season. This makes its population density about 0.01 person per square kilometre (0.25 person per square mile). There are very few humans, but the same can’t be said for the fauna. It’s estimated that live on this southern Atlantic Ocean island. Albatrosses, puffins, and whalebirds share the beaches of this magnificent, isolated destination.

Slide 15 of 21: Located in the heart of the Amazon jungle, Suriname has a population density of 3.1 people per square kilometre (eight people per square mile). As is the case for its neighbours, Guyana and French Guiana, the massive forest limits urban development in this South American country. One of the attractions of Suriname is its multicultural diversity—the population is made up of descendants from African slaves, Dutch colonists, Asian workers, and First Nations peoples. The country’s official language is Dutch.
Slide 16 of 21: Despite having a territory three times the size of France, Libya has a very low population density. Only three people per square kilometre (eight people per square mile) live in this North African country. According to Britannica, the low population density is a result of the fact that most of Libya’s land includes some of the most arid parts of the Sahara Desert. In the southern part of the country, the temperature can reach into the high 50 Cs (135 F) during the summer.
Slide 17 of 21: Still largely unknown to travellers, Guyana has a lot to offer in terms of outdoor activities as well as undiscovered flora and fauna. Bordered by Suriname, Venezuela, and Brazil, this South American country is home to only three people per square kilometre (eight people per square mile). Its territory is home to 18 per cent of the world’s tropical rainforests, making it the cradle of a very impressive ecosystem. You can find many mythical creatures there, like jaguars, anacondas, and caimans. Guyana is also known for its Kaieteur Falls, whose height is famous throughout the world.
Slide 18 of 21: The nearly 2,000 residents of the Svalbard Archipelago, a Norwegian territory, share a magnificent and enormous land of ice. The population density is about 0.04 person per square kilometre (0.1 person per square mile) on this group of islands located east of Greenland. Most of its population is concentrated in the city of Longyearbyen on Spitsbergen. Svalbard displays a breathtaking panorama composed of rocky peaks, polar bears, and glaciers. Adventurous tourists explore this polar region every year, but accessing it remains challenging due to how far away the archipelago is and the limited ways there are to reach it.
Slide 19 of 21: The Nunavut Territory in Canada’s Far North is so vast that its population density is nearly zero. There are only about 30,000 people across a land that has an area of nearly two million square kilometres (770,000 square miles). Surprisingly, Iqaluit, the capital of this largest Canadian territory, has seen significant growth over the last five years. Located in the High Arctic, Nunavut enjoys 24 hours of sunlight during the month of June, but daily sunlight drops to just six hours a day in December.
Slide 20 of 21: At this moment, Western Sahara, located between Morocco and Mauritania, is considered a non-self-governing territory, according to the United Nations. This enormous stretch of sand covers about 266,000 square kilometres and has been claimed by both Morocco and the Polisario Front for more than 40 years. The population density of Western Sahara is 2.6 people per square kilometre (6.7 people per square mile). Tourism is beginning to develop because of the beautiful landscapes that dot its coastline.
Slide 21 of 21: Unfortunately, Sapelo Island is a part of the dark chapter of slavery in the early 1800s. At this time, many slaves from West Africa were brought by boat to work on plantations. Many of them never left this island that lies off the coast of Georgia, even after the abolition of these barbarous acts. There are now about 50 permanent residents on Sapelo Island, almost all of whom have African roots. The population density of this island, which is increasingly becoming a tourist destination, is about one person per square kilometre.

The least populated places on Earth

The seven billion people who call Earth home are far from spread evenly around the globe. As reported in The Atlantic, half of the world’s population lives on one per cent of the Earth’s surface. It’s not surprising, then, that certain places are nearly deserted or unoccupied. If you’re the type of person who loves wide-open spaces or you just want to get away from your neighbours, here’s a roundup of the 20 least populated places on the planet.

French Guiana

With a demographic density of 3.5 people per square kilometre (nine people per square mile), French Guiana is France’s second-least populated territory. The land in this department is owned by France and is 90 per cent covered by the Guianan Moist Forests. Most of the population is concentrated on the coast of this South American territory. Thanks to its lush green resources, French Guiana enjoys exceptional biodiversity.

Sakha Republic, Russia

Stretching over nearly three million square kilometres (1.16 million square miles), the Sakha Republic is one of the least populated places in the world. Its density is barely 0.3 people per square kilometre (0.8 people per square mile). Its geographical size, along with its cold northern climate, limit urban development in this region of Russia. The coldest village on Earth, Oymyakon, is found in the Sakha Republic. The average temperature in January is -46 degrees Celsius (-51 degrees Fahrenheit).

Mauritania

Mauritania is one of the least populated countries in the world. Despite being about the size of Egypt, this African country has scarcely four people per square kilometre (10 people per square mile). Most of its territory is covered by the Sahara Desert. The desertification of its land is accentuated by its dry and extremely hot climate.

Mongolia

Mongolia wins the prize for being the least densely populated country in the world, with only 1.5 people per square kilometre (four people per square mile). Nearly 30 per cent of Mongols are either nomadic or semi-nomadic. This is partially explained by the traditional way of life that is based on shepherding large herds of animals. Mongolia also has a climate and soil that is very dry, two factors that are not conducive to urbanization.

Antarctica

Sterile and hostile, Antarctica is, without a doubt, the least populated place on Earth. There is no permanent population, although some 1,500 scientists reside there for fixed periods of time. However, nearly 80,000 tourists are expected to set foot on its glaciers in 2020.

Australian Outback

The Australian Outback might draw a good number of tourists looking for an adventure, but it certainly doesn’t have a lot of permanent residents. With fewer than one million inhabitants, its area is equal to about two-thirds of Europe. The population density is barely 0.1 person per square kilometre (0.25 person per square mile) in this red desert. The temperature shifts are also drastic—at night the thermometer can reach almost freezing, then swing to above 40 C (104 F) during the day.

Falkland Islands

With a population density of less than one person per square kilometre (2.5 people per square mile), you could say that the Falkland Islands are essentially uninhabited. This overseas British territory is made up of two main islands, East and West Falkland, along with 700 smaller islands. Many tourists visit the islands to see the king penguins, a major attraction of this isolated destination.

Greenland

Despite having a population of nearly 60,000, the population density of Greenland remains one of the lowest in the world—around 0.3 person per square kilometre (0.8 person per square mile)—due to the country’s enormous land mass of over two million square kilometres (775,000 square miles). Surprisingly, there are no roads that connect the different villages on what is essentially the largest island in the world. Tourists and residents must travel by boat, dogsled, helicopter, plane, or snowmobile.

Pitcairn Islands

Along with living in paradise, Pitcairn residents are unlikely to get in each other’s way. They number barely 50 on a land mass of 47 square kilometres (18 square miles). Pitcairn Island is the only inhabited island of the four that make up this unique British territory in the Pacific Ocean. Colonization of the island came about after a mutiny on the HMS Bounty at the end of the 1700s. For the mutineers, Pitcairn seemed like the perfect place to escape justice and live in peace.

Namibia

Namibia is among the top three countries in the world with the lowest population density. With just 2.85 people per square kilometre (7.4 people per square mile), the 2.5 million inhabitants of this southern African country are divided into 11 ethnicities. Nearly half of the population consider themselves Ovambo.

Iceland

The 19th-largest island in the world is home to about three people per square kilometre (eight people per square mile). Located in the North Atlantic Ocean, this isolated place is covered in volcanoes, fjords, and waterfalls. Nearly two-thirds of the population live in the country’s capital, Reykjavik.

The sub-Antarctic district, French Southern and Antarctic Lands

Dispersed throughout the Indian Ocean, the sub-Antarctic district of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands is composed of four archipelagos: the Kerguelen Islands, the Crozet Islands, and the St. Paul and Amsterdam Islands. This French overseas territory is situated in a very inhospitable part of the world. The temperature rarely goes above freezing, and the winds can easily reach 250 km/h (155 mph)—making it impossible for a permanent population to reside there. Scientific bases hold between 40 and 100 researchers for a few months at a time. The largest island in the sub-Antarctic district is Kerguelen, which spans roughly 7,000 square kilometres (2,700 square miles).

South Georgia Island

This British overseas territory has a permanent population of between 200 and 1,400 inhabitants, depending on the season. This makes its population density about 0.01 person per square kilometre (0.25 person per square mile). There are very few humans, but the same can’t be said for the fauna. It’s estimated that live on this southern Atlantic Ocean island. Albatrosses, puffins, and whalebirds share the beaches of this magnificent, isolated destination.

Suriname

Located in the heart of the Amazon jungle, Suriname has a population density of 3.1 people per square kilometre (eight people per square mile). As is the case for its neighbours, Guyana and French Guiana, the massive forest limits urban development in this South American country. One of the attractions of Suriname is its multicultural diversity—the population is made up of descendants from African slaves, Dutch colonists, Asian workers, and First Nations peoples. The country’s official language is Dutch.

Libya

Despite having a territory three times the size of France, Libya has a very low population density. Only three people per square kilometre (eight people per square mile) live in this North African country. According to Britannica, the low population density is a result of the fact that most of Libya’s land includes some of the most arid parts of the Sahara Desert. In the southern part of the country, the temperature can reach into the high 50 Cs (135 F) during the summer.

Guyana

Still largely unknown to travellers, Guyana has a lot to offer in terms of outdoor activities as well as undiscovered flora and fauna. Bordered by Suriname, Venezuela, and Brazil, this South American country is home to only three people per square kilometre (eight people per square mile). Its territory is home to 18 per cent of the world’s tropical rainforests, making it the cradle of a very impressive ecosystem. You can find many mythical creatures there, like jaguars, anacondas, and caimans. Guyana is also known for its Kaieteur Falls, whose height is famous throughout the world.

Svalbard Archipelago

The nearly 2,000 residents of the Svalbard Archipelago, a Norwegian territory, share a magnificent and enormous land of ice. The population density is about 0.04 person per square kilometre (0.1 person per square mile) on this group of islands located east of Greenland. Most of its population is concentrated in the city of Longyearbyen on Spitsbergen. Svalbard displays a breathtaking panorama composed of rocky peaks, polar bears, and glaciers. Adventurous tourists explore this polar region every year, but accessing it remains challenging due to how far away the archipelago is and the limited ways there are to reach it.

Nunavut, Canada

The Nunavut Territory in Canada’s Far North is so vast that its population density is nearly zero. There are only about 30,000 people across a land that has an area of nearly two million square kilometres (770,000 square miles). Surprisingly, Iqaluit, the capital of this largest Canadian territory, has seen significant growth over the last five years. Located in the High Arctic, Nunavut enjoys 24 hours of sunlight during the month of June, but daily sunlight drops to just six hours a day in December.

Western Sahara

At this moment, Western Sahara, located between Morocco and Mauritania, is considered a non-self-governing territory, according to the United Nations. This enormous stretch of sand covers about 266,000 square kilometres and has been claimed by both Morocco and the Polisario Front for more than 40 years. The population density of Western Sahara is 2.6 people per square kilometre (6.7 people per square mile). Tourism is beginning to develop because of the beautiful landscapes that dot its coastline.

Sapelo Island, Georgia, USA

Unfortunately, Sapelo Island is a part of the dark chapter of slavery in the early 1800s. At this time, many slaves from West Africa were brought by boat to work on plantations. Many of them never left this island that lies off the coast of Georgia, even after the abolition of these barbarous acts. There are now about 50 permanent residents on Sapelo Island, almost all of whom have African roots. The population density of this island, which is increasingly becoming a tourist destination, is about one person per square kilometre.

Source: Read Full Article